December 31, 2013

Roman Bioarchaeology Carnival XXXVI

Not much news in the sleepy month of December. Here's what I've got for your New Year's reading pleasure:

North Yorkshire Roman skeleton
2 December - Man discovers ancient cemetery under his house (The Cairo Post).  It could be Roman in date. Little other information appears to be available.

4 December - Ancient skeleton found in North Yorkshire sewer trench (BBC News). A flexed burial, relatively intact and assumed to date to Roman Britain, was found. No word yet on age/sex/etc.

16 December - Vandals destroy a skeleton found at Favignana (AGI.it). Not much info here, particularly as to date, but it seems that an ancient skeleton that had been partially excavated was destroyed by vandals or tomb robbers.

24 December - Vatican to open poignant ancient Roman cemetery (BBC News). So this is actually really exciting.  The cemetery in the Vatican car park has actually been published (as a large coffeetable book in Italian and in English), and the burials are simply fascinating.  I do not think, though, that the analysis of the skeletons themselves has been published (or even done fully). But there is a whole lot of cool material culture (and even cooler skeletons) from this cemetery, so it's great that it'll be open to the public.  Next time I'm in Rome, perhaps...

27 December - Bioarchaeologist Moreno Tiziani wrote an interesting review of the "Written in Bone" exhibit at the Museo della via Ostiense in Rome.  His review is in Italian, but google translate does a reasonable job with it.

Alright, I hope you all have a great new year, and I hope to see everyone back here next year for more Powered by Osteons!

3 comments:

igor_japan said...

Could you please tell title of the book about the cemetery in Vatican you mention in your post?

The cemetery in the Vatican car park has actually been published (as a large coffeetable book in Italian and in English), and the burials are simply fascinating.

Kristina Killgrove said...

Sure. It's called the Vatican Necropoles by Paolo Liverani. It isn't all that common in English; I've found it in more libraries in Italian, for whatever reason. Here's a link to the English version - http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=11164366158&searchurl=ds%3D30%26isbn%3D9782503535784%26n%3D100121501%26sortby%3D17.

igor_japan said...

Thank you very much for info and very interesting blog!

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