September 3, 2012

Invitation to an Ancient Roman Dinner

I'm a bit embarrassed to admit - considering just how active I am in social media and science outreach - that I'd never heard of the science cafe phenomenon until I arrived in Pensacola.  Basically, it's a community-organized series of talks in which the speaker engages the public directly, in a small setting (often involving food or coffee).  So I jumped at the chance to speak at one when invited by Mike Thomin at the Florida Public Archaeology Network.

In two weeks, I'll be talking about how to eat like a Roman:


If you're in the area, please do come out for the first science cafe of the new school year.  And if you're not, the conversation might eventually make it to the web.  (Last spring's talk on the Archaeology of the Taco by my colleague Ramie Gougeon is available to watch on FPAN's website.)

And do go check out a science cafe in your area!

(P.S. This might mean a delay in my review of the season premiere of Bones, but I hope to get to it as soon as possible.)

4 comments:

jdm314 said...

Too bad, I don't think I can make it! But I will be sure to let my food history friends know... maybe someone is in the area.

James Corner said...

This really a good idea, I love to visit, but I think I cant make it, But I will follow you on the web.

jdm314 said...

So, how did it go?

Kristina Killgrove said...

It went pretty well, thanks for asking. A couple dozen people came out, which was pretty good for a rainy Monday evening (and there was another science cafe going on in the area too, so there was competition!).

There was definitely a lot of interest in how the Romans ate and what the Romans ate. It was nice to be able to talk about that with an interested audience... most of the time, I'm talking about anthropology (e.g., in teaching) rather than classics.

There will be a video up at some point. I'll post a link when it goes live.

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