January 2, 2012

Review of Roman Diasporas in AJA

A review has come out in the latest issue of the American Journal of Archaeology of an edited volume in which I have two papers.  David Mattingly's comments on Roman Diasporas (2010) are quite complimentary, which means a lot coming from a giant in the field.  Thankfully, AJA has seen fit to make the review free to read online.  Please do read it if you're interested in the latest approaches - both scientific and humanistic - to the study of the disparate peoples of the Roman Empire.

My only major quibble with Mattingly's review is that he characterizes the Montgomery et al. article (on which I'm a coauthor) as a study of lead concentration to identify immigrants.  Lead isotopes can do so; lead concentration tells you how much lead a person ingested (and thus whether or not they had lead poisoning, which, to me, is a more interesting finding than the lead isotope data).  Perhaps it's just his wording, but it seems he's conflating isotopes and concentration.  (Minor grammatical quibbles that may be AJA's fault: page one has "isoptic" and page three has "data is.")

If you want the whole thing, you can buy Roman Diasporas through the Journal of Roman Archaeology, or email me if you can't find a copy and want to read my articles:
  • Killgrove, K. 2010. Identifying immigrants to Imperial Rome using strontium isotope analysis. In Roman Diasporas: Archaeological Approaches to Mobility and Diversity in the Roman Empire, H. Eckardt ed. Journal of Roman Archaeology supplement 78, Chapter 9, pp. 157-174.
  • Montgomery J, J Evans, S Chenery, V Pashley, K Killgrove. 2010. “Gleaming, white and deadly”: lead exposure and geographic origins in the Roman period. In Roman Diasporas: Archaeological Approaches to Mobility and Diversity in the Roman Empire, H. Eckardt ed. Journal of Roman Archaeology supplement 78, Chapter 11, pp. 199-226.

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